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A switch to insect-based animal feeds could help the UK reach its net zero carbon emissions target, researchers say.  Among other issues, tackling emissions from agriculture is vital if the UK is to reach its 2050 target, and insect-based feeds offer a promising method to feed animals in a sustainable, low-carbon way. Exploring the science behind insect-based feeds has never been more topical, and a project led by Entec Nutrition, which was set up by 2 University of Exeter scientists, has won a £250,000 grant from the Innovate UK's transforming food production scheme to do just that.Insect-based feeds offer a promising method to feed animals in a sustainable, low-carbon way. Photo: Henk Riswick“We are thrilled to have won this Innovate UK grant with our research partners,” says Dr Olivia Champion, who co-founded Entec Nutrition with University of Exeter colleague Professor Richard Titball. “It’s really exciting for Entec Nutrition to form part of the UK’s...

BRF has announced all eggs used in its processed products will come from cage-free systems as of this month. The measure is part of an initiative to increase animal welfare sooner rather than later. The current step was originally planned for 2025.BRF moves its timeline to use cage free eggs forward by 5 years and wants the job done by the end of this year. Photo: Hans BanusAccording to the company, more than 23 million eggs are used each year in the production of its processed products, such as lasagna, pizza, cheese breads and pies. Starting this month, those eggs come from a supplier that has the Cage Free certification attested by the NGO Certified Humane. Its standards include balanced nutrition free of antibiotics or hormones, resting areas for animals and adequate space for natural manifestation of each species.   Eliminated use of caged layer eggs “With this initiative in Brazil, we have eliminated...

New research has shown that even low levels of mycotoxins found in animal feed have a direct negative impact on the performance of broiler chickens.   The longitudinal three-year study, a first of its kind in this field, was conducted by Oluwatobi Kolawole at the Institute for Global Food Security (IGFS) at Queen’s University Belfast, in partnership with agri technology company Devenish. Published in the Toxins journal of July 2020, the study demonstrated the negative effects of low levels of naturally-occurring toxic substances, i.e. mycotoxins found in animal feed, on poultry performance and health.   In a long-term feeding trial to evaluate the effect of low doses of mycotoxin mixtures, 18 consecutive broiler flocks were monitored on performance and feed intake. Photo: Chris McCullough Oluwatobi Kolawole, lead researcher at the School of Biological Sciences, Queen’s University Belfast, said: “Mycotoxins are chemicals produced by fungi that can have serious effects on health, performance and the immune system of animals and humans...

“The misinformation passed on through social media about spread of the virus through poultry and egg has reduced prices drastically in the last four-months,” said the director of leading poultry company in Haryana, who didn’t wish to be identified. It’s a double whammy for poultry farmers as birdfeed prices are up by 35-45 per cent compared to the last winter season, he said. The egg industry has taken maximum hit as wholesale prices have slipped below the breakeven level as rising inventories force farmers to push sales. “The supply of egg has swelled against shrinking demand and poultry owners are struck with inventories,” said Sukjinder Singh, a poultry farmer based in Punjab. “We are incurring loss per egg as the input cost is 40-50 per cent higher than a year ago.” He said poultry farmers are not able to pass on the input cost to wholesalers and are incurring loss on birds and...

New Delhi: The animal husbandry, dairy and fisheries ministry is concerned over the low consumption of milk and poultry products due to the lockdown, even though they come under essential services. Union minister for animal husbandry, dairy and fisheries, Giriraj Singh along with ministers of state, Sanjeev Balyan and Pratap Sarangi, have been taking stock of the situation on a regular basis. Ever since the lockdown, both the items have witnessed a decline in consumption largely due to supply and demand issues. Initially, many people didn’t buy chicken because of rumours that Covid-19 might spread through poultry. However, the ministry has been regularly clarifying that there is no harm in having chicken. Post the imposition of the lockdown, poultry shops have remained closed. After receiving complaints, the ministry wrote a letter on March 23 to the chief secretaries of all the states to issue necessary directions to include chicken, egg and meat in the...

New Delhi, The poultry industry in different parts of the country has been hit hard amid rumours that the novel coronavirus can transmitted through consumption of chicken, the prices of which have fallen considerably as a result.Vijay Sardana, an agricultural economist and adviser of the Poultry Federation of India, said that poultrymen were getting just Rs 20 per bird in the market whereas the cost of production was Rs 80.He said the jobs of about two crore people employed in the poultry industry across the country have been impacted.People were avoiding consumption of meat, fish, chicken, and egg etc. Due to the fall in demand, wholesale price of chicken had dropped by as much as 70 per cent. As a result, chicken was now available at Rs 100-150 per kg in retail compared with Rs 180-200 earlier on.Union Minister of Animal Husbandry, Dairying and Fisheries Giriraj Singh has admitted the...

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